September 15, 2022
"Narcissists" | Divorce | Narcissistic Personality Disorder (NPD) | Mental Health Stigma

This video/podcast is about the over used term "Narcissists" that people are increasingly weaponizing against those that they do not like any longer. Divorce is a situation where individual(s) want to throw around the mental health diagnosis Narcissistic Personality Disorder (NPD) and this adversely impacts Families, Neighbors, Friends and increases the already rampant Me…


This video/podcast is about the over used term "Narcissists" that people are increasingly weaponizing against those that they do not like any longer.

Divorce is a situation where individual(s) want to throw around the mental health diagnosis Narcissistic Personality Disorder (NPD) and this adversely impacts Families, Neighbors, Friends and increases the already rampant Mental Health Stigma that exist throughout America damaging countless lives.

Transcript

**** Transcript Disclaimer: Transcript(s) and/or Subtitle(s) are autogenerated, thus there will be errors. Thank you for your understanding in advance. ****

today's video and podcasts are going to be about the term that people like to unfortunately, casually throw around, referred to as narcissist in the mental health diagnosis, narcissistic personality disorder. Okay, first and foremost, I want to throw out my disclaimer real quick and just let all of you know that this information is for this video podcast is for informational, educational and or entertainment purposes only. This does not establish a mental health clinical relationship with anyone whatsoever. If you are experiencing emergency, please call 911. If you are in need of professional mental health services, please find a licensed behavioral health clinician in your area to assist you with that. Thank you. This is not for that.  So my name is Vanessa. But one thing I've noticed is that people are increasingly throwing around the word narcissist in our society, in America, when it comes to anyone that they don't seem to like anymore. And the most popular person for this to happen to is an ex, assumed to be ex spouse, ex wife, ex husband. It could even be a boyfriend, girlfriend, whatever the case may be. And I'm going to get into why this is a really bad idea to do that. The first issue is that it increases mental health stigma, which in our society is already really high. I mean, mental health stigma is so severe in America that it literally has the ability to destroy people's lives. It does. Their reputations, their lives, their careers, life as they know it. People hide mental health issues all the time, and you have no idea they have a mental health disorder of any kind because they're so afraid that if people find out, that it's going to destroy their life. So this is a really big issue. And simply throwing around names and name calling arbitrarily because a person doesn't like another person or has a conflict with another person or is going through a nasty divorce or custody battle with another person is just wrong. It's wrong. So there is a mental health diagnosis that can be found in this book right here. The Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, fifth edition, DSM five. This has been published by the American Psychiatric Association. Okay. And this book is utilized by countless mental health professionals in America. All right? And inside the book, you will find, and I'm going to go ahead and share that with you now, a page on page 671, if you have the version I have, but if you don't, that's the page it's on. And I'm going to share some information about this. So this is narcissistic personality disorder. It's real diagnosis. I'm not going to get into the nitty and gritty about it because I'm not trying to encourage anyone to diagnose their friends, their family, their neighbors, their exes, their spouses, their boyfriends or girlfriends, or their soon to be exes. I don't want that at all, OK? That is not what I'm encouraging here at all. What I'm trying to do in this podcast video is to really educate people about why it's a bad idea to run around calling everyone you don't like a narcissist. So the prevalence according to the American Psychiatric Association of Narcissistic personality disorder. I'm going to read this verbatim. Prevalence estimates for narcissistic personality disorder based on DSM. Five..........

...........So just because you don't like somebody, just because you're going through a divorce doesn't mean that they have narcissistic personality disorder. There are countless videos online that talked about your spouse, your ex, divorcing, a narcissist, all these kinds of things. They talk about it. But the reality is, I think, that this is being covered as a topic because it's popular. It's a popular topic that people like to watch videos about and listen to podcasts about. And I've kind of come to my own conclusion about this, which is that if I don't like the general information being put out on a specific topic, then I need to go ahead and weigh in with my own voice and my own knowledge and my own experiences, whether it be personal or professional. In this case it's professional experience. And weigh in on that because it's like, just because you're going through a divorce doesn't mean that the person has a personality disorder necessarily. And if the person is genuinely concerned about another person's mental health and their family, right, it's not going to be most productive to start yelling at them, you're a narcissist, you're a narcissist, you're a narcissist, and tell everyone and their mother what a narcissist you think that person is. That's not going to be productive, that's going to be counterproductive. Instead, what would be helpful possibly is if you're in a position in a relationship with that person that is intact, to have a careful, caring conversation with them about helping them get connected with those that could be of support to them in their time of need, whatever support they may need at that point in time. It's going to vary from individual to individual. And of course, finding a competent, licensed mental health professional in the right circumstances would be ideal for certain individuals, potentially. Okay? And so it's not helpful though, yelling at people and calling them names and because even if they do have a mental health disorder, it's sympathy is stigmatizing. Mental health as it is already stigmatized it's increasing that stigma. It is true that there are people with mental health disorders and I really wish that mental health disorders were treated in the same way mental health illness as physical illness. When someone has a bad back or a bad knee or some kind of injury. If they break their leg. If they have some kind of chronic condition that's physical. People in many cases are very apt to feel bad for that person. To give them some kind of meal to express like. Oh. I hope you feel better soon. To help them out in their time of need to have empathy. But it seems like as soon as someone has a mental health disorder. Or it's suspected that they do. Or they're exhibiting some kind of mental health related symptom. Possibly. That they're then treated like less than pushed to the fringe kind of our society and the mental health is further stigmatize these issues and the more we can kind of get away from that and have empathy and compassion for people and view health as more of a holistic situation instead of just compartmentalizing different illnesses. The more healthy people can become overall, the more healthy families can become and the more amicable divorces and separations can become when we can drop the labels and start having some compassion for each other and some empathy. So that is my take on this term narcissist that is thrown around way too much by way too many people. Alright, I wish you all the best and I hope you have a great day. Bye.